Loss of Human Knowledge




A Cosmic Perspective

taken from

Homer Smith (1952) Man and His Gods,

and

Earl Balfour (1895) Foundations of Belief


Man did not have forever to harness the forces of the sun and stars. The Sun was an elderly light, long past the turbulent heat of youth, and would some day join the senile class of once-luminiferous bodies. In some incredibly remote time a chance collision might blow it up again into incandescent gas and start a new local cosmic cycle, but of man there would be no trace. In Balfours's terms, he "will go down into the pit, and all his thoughts will perish. The uneasy consciousness, which in this obscure corner has for a brief space broken the contented silence of the universe, will be at rest. Matter will know itself no longer. 'Imperishable monuments' and 'immortal deeds,' death itself, and love stronger than death, will be as though they had never been. Nor will anything that IS be better or be worse for all that labour, genius, devotion and suffering of man have striven through countless generations to effect."

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